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  • Will Going to Mental Health End My Career?

    We have all heard the warnings: “Don’t go to Mental Health unless you want to get kicked out,” “They take away your weapons,” “You will never fly again if you seek out Mental Health services,” and “They tell you, you can never drink again.” So, what is the truth? Do they really end our careers, take away our weapons, prevent us from being on flying status, or tell us we can never drink? Do they have this power?
  • Iceman in Action: SrA Darren Hopkins

    Rank and Name: Senior Airman Darren Hopkins Duty Title: 354th Maintenance Squadron Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician Hometown: Washington D.C.
  • NATO provides "eye in the sky" for RED FLAG

    The air war is underway at Red Flag-Alaska 18-1. But fifty miles southwest and ten thousand feet above the dog fighting, a NATO E-3A Component jet circles in its flight pattern, soaking up signals and squawks about the fluid battle space below and providing friendly forces a watchful "eye in the sky" that extends in every direction for hundreds of miles.
  • Eielson's Police Week 2018

    Airmen from the 354th Security Forces Squadron salute during the playing of Taps at the end of the Police Week 2018 retreat ceremony May 18, 2018 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Taps is a bugle call which has been played at military funerals since 1862 to honor the fallen service members who have made the ultimate sacrifice. (U.S. Air Force
  • Israel fueling the fight for RF-A 18-1

    More than 5,000 miles from home, an Israeli Air Force B-707 waits high in the sky over Alaska. This location differs greatly from Israel, from the cold and snow to the huge swathes of uninterrupted wilderness, the two places couldn’t be more different. In spite of this, the real challenge for the Israeli B-707 was preparing for and accomplishing its mission to provide in-flight refueling to forces during RED FLAG-Alaska 18-1.
  • Air Force & Army Integrate During RED FLAG-Alaska

    Modern warfare is in a state of continual evolution, from how the battle is fought to the tools and equipment with which those battles are won. This is why being able to train with the most cutting edge military technology is so vital to the readiness of the force, as they learn to grapple with the nuances of 21st century combat. However, RED FLAG-Alaska provides an ideal platform for integration of joint and multinational forces to train with the latest advances so we can maintain a competitive edge, no matter how future battles are waged.
  • NATO provides "eye in the sky" for RED FLAG

    The air war is underway at RED FLAG-Alaska 18-1. But fifty miles southwest and ten thousand feet above the dog fighting, a NATO E-3A Component jet circles in its flight pattern, soaking up signals and squawks about the fluid battle space below and providing friendly forces a watchful "eye in the sky" that extends in every direction for hundreds of miles. As a NATO unit, Airmen from around the world work the rows of screens and scopes in the middle of the aircraft, their country's respective flag adorning their shoulders. Everyone stares intently at their screen, all of them sharing the common goal of identifying and calling out new targets as they appear on the scope. The mission crew is comprised of a surveillance team, a weapons team, and airborne technicians; they are responsible to the tactical director, who is the senior member of the mission crew.
  • 168th Wing maintainers support RF-A 18-1

    U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Charles Hayes, a hydraulics technician assigned to the 168th Maintenance Squadron, Alaska Air National Guard, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, repairs a steering disconnect valve for a KC-135R May 3, 2018. As a hydraulics technician, Hayes has the ability to diagnose problems related to the hydraulics systems and work with
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