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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jonathan Patino, a 354th Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle maintenance journeyman, inspects the belt and fluids from a vehicle Aug. 10, 2016, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Patino also checks for visual damage to the vehicle before labeling it safe for use and returning it to work. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cassandra Whitman) Managing the fleet during RF-A 16-3
As jets take off and people disperse from their spots on the flightline, one tends to wonder how they get to and from each place. Do they walk everywhere? Or do they borrow a car? If you guessed borrowing a car, you might have won a million dollars on “Who Wants to be a Millionaire,” but in the Air Force, borrowing a car takes place with the 354th Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle management fleet.
0 8/11
2016
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Drew Davies, a weather forecaster assigned to the 35th Operations Support Squadron out of Misawa Air Base, Japan, looks over weather changes at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Aug. 10, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-3. Davies is temporarily deployed to Eielson in support of RF-A 16-3, an exercise that is vital to maintaining peace and stability in the Indo-Asia Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cassandra Whitman) Weathering the days of RF-A 16-3
Through wind, rain, sleet, snow, fog and storms, weather Airmen are an essential part to any mission. RED FLAG-Alaska, is no exception to the rule, as pilots depend on the accuracy of weather predictions for the safety of their jets and themselves. Senior Airman Drew Davies, a weather forecaster assigned to the 35th Operations Support Squadron out of Misawa Air Base, Japan, is temporarily deployed to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska to support the mission of RF-A 16-3.
0 8/11
2016
Jimmy Rodriguez, a Gold Rush Inn maintenance supervisor, with the 354th Force Support Squadron, takes a break from working Aug. 9, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-3, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Rodriguez is one of three employees responsible for maintaining all of the lodging facilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Isaac Johnson)
A home away from home
Stepping into the lobby it smells like coffee, people are everywhere. The snack store is busier than usual while phones are ringing off the hook in the background. Employees of the Gold Rush Inn are usually busy, but when occupancy rates nearly triple within a few days timespan, they know it’s RED FLAG-Alaska season. The Gold Rush Inn is an important component of RF-A being able to run smoothly, and its employees work hard to make sure that happens.
0 8/10
2016
Default Air Force Logo Some IDs may be invalid starting Aug. 15
Individuals will no longer be allowed unescorted access to Air Force installations with a state-issued identification card or driver’s license from Minnesota, Missouri, Washington or American Samoa beginning Aug. 15.
0 8/10
2016
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Corey Holt, an aircrew egress systems craftsman assigned to the 35th Maintenance Squadron, Misawa Air Base, Japan, holds an ejection seat still in an F-16D Fighting Falcon aircraft while Staff Sgt. Shawn Layou, an aircrew egress systems craftsman assigned to the 8th Maintenance Squadron, Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea, bolts it into place Aug. 9, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-3 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Units from across the Department of Defense and partner nations send units to Eielson for RF-A to train for contingency operations in a controlled environment stressing joint and multinational integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel) Kunsan, Misawa Airmen integrate to save funds, hours
With budgets under constant constraint and fluctuation in manning, even at home stations, Airmen have to be creative to save tax payer’s dollars while keeping Airmen rested to maintain top performance in life saving missions. Maintenance Airmen from Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, and Misawa AB, Japan combined their skills saving these man-hours and temporary duty funds during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-3.
0 8/09
2016
U.S. Army Spc. Angel Mendoza, 4th Space Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Space Brigade, assigned as a space aggressor operator to the 527th Space Aggressor Squadron, Schreiver Air Force Base, Colo., secures a helical antenna to a gravel pad adjacent to the flight line Aug. 8, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-3, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Along with two modems and an amplifier, space aggressors at RF-A 16-3 interrupt GPS systems for navigation and weapons, which pilots use during the exercise designed to simulate the first 10 combat sorties of a surge operation or conflict. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel) Army, AF integrate first ever space aggressor soldier in RF-A 16-3
Finding a camouflaged enemy to “find, fix and finish,” can be difficult even in the best conditions. Add in the element of 14,000-foot peaks, dense vegetation and a 67,000 square-mile battlefield and takes a trained warrior to pick out the needle in this haystack. With no GPS to guide a fighter pilot, finding the enemy or even the way home, makes locating that needle near impossible. The first-ever Army Space Aggressor soldier integrated with Airmen from the 527th Space Aggressors Squadron, and their Air Force reserve component, the 26th SAS, from Schreiver Air Force Base, Colorado, to sharpen pilots’ skills by degrading aircraft GPS during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-3.
0 8/09
2016
A U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft assigned to the 18th Aggressor Squadron, takes off from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, for a mission Aug. 8, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-3. RF-A enables joint and international units to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment, which allows them to exchange tactics, techniques and procedures while improving interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cassandra Whitman) Multinational units take off during RF-A 16-3

0 8/08
2016
A U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle dual-role fighter aircraft assigned to the 336th Fighter Squadron, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., prepares to take off Aug. 5, 2016, from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, during familiarization day of RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-3. Originally operated under the name COPE THUNDER, the exercise moved to Eielson in 1992 from Clark Air Base, Philippines, after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo on June 15, 1991. COPE THUNDER was re-designated RF-A in 2006. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel) RF-A 16-3 brings nations, joint training together
RED FLAG-Alaska 16-3, a Pacific Air Forces-sponsored, Joint National Training Capability accredited exercise, officially started Aug. 4 with familiarization day, followed by 10 days of simulated combat sorties. Originally operated under the name COPE THUNDER, the exercise moved to Eielson in 1992 from Clark Air Base, Philippines, after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo on June 15, 1991. The exercise was re-designated RED FLAG-Alaska in 2006.
0 8/08
2016
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Terence Greenhill, a 354th Medical Group mental health technician, takes a quick photo break Aug. 3, 2016, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Greenhill said his favorite part of his job is engaging in outreach to each individual unit on base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Isaac Johnson) Iceman in Action: Airman 1st Class Terence Greenhill Jr.
Rank and Name: Airman 1st Class Terence Greenhill Jr. Duty Title: Mental health technician, 354th Medical Group Hometown: Radcliff, Kentucky
0 8/04
2016
U.S. Air Force 1st. Lt. Andrew Heard, the 354th Contracting Squadron services and commodities flight commander, takes a break from climbing Denali, in Interior Alaska on July 29, 2016. At 20,308 feet above sea level, Denali is the tallest mountain in North America. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st. Lt. Andrew Heard) ‘Aim High’: Airman stands on top of continent
At 20,308 feet above sea level, Denali is considered one of the most challenging peaks to conquer in the world. Thousands of people have tried, and failed, to reach the top. On June 16, 1st Lt. Andrew Heard, the 354th Contracting Squadron services and commodities flight commander, climbed the tallest peak in North America. For Heard, being able to stand on top of one of the most prominent peaks in the world began as a dream two years earlier.
0 8/01
2016
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