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ADAPT Expo takes over Baker Field House

ADAPT Expo takes over Baker Field House

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Josh Mattix, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron structures technician, rides a bike with drunk goggles during the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment (ADAPT) Expo April 5, 2018, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Drunk goggles were used to show how being intoxicated can affect their driving. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cassie Whitman)

ADAPT Expo takes over Baker Field House

A group of U.S. Air Force Airmen listen as Tech. Sgt. Niccolet Cleghorn, a 354th Medical Group mental health technician, explains how gender and weight affect intoxication levels at the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment (ADAPT) Expo April 5, 2018, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Cleghorn also explained the amount of alcohol found in typical drinks and the importance of knowing what you’re drinking. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cassie Whitman)

ADAPT Expo takes over Baker Field House

U.S. Air Force Airmen discuss and practice taking a field-sobriety test during the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment (ADAPT) Expo April 5, 2018, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The 354th Security Forces Squadron participated in the expo to explain some aspects of the field sobriety test and the ways intoxication can affect perception. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cassie Whitman)

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska --

Eielson’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment team held an ADAPT Expo at the Baker Field House, which took Airmen through a typical night of drinking.

Several stations were set up to help the Airmen visually recreate what this night may look like. The first station explained how intoxication levels can vary based on gender, weight and the type of drink(s) they consume.

“We have this chart to help explain how much alcohol are in some typical drinks you’d have on a night out,” said Staff Sgt. Taryn Lauer, a 354th Medical Group mental health technician. “Not many people realize that, say a long island iced tea, is almost the equivalent of five drinks.”

At the next station, Airmen were greeted by Alaska State Trooper Malik Jones, who took the time to explain how driving a car looks and feels when drunk. Airmen were provided drunk goggles and a bicycle to navigate through cones. The goggles were designed to give the illusion of driving while intoxicated.

“The last station has security forces personnel performing field sobriety tests on Airmen while they wear drunk goggles,” said Lauer. “We want them to see how being intoxicated affects perception.”

The ADAPT team has also seen a positive correlation between Expo attendance and the number of referrals they get for alcohol related incidents. The more attendees at the Expo, the less referrals they receive.

“We also have the Office of Special Investigations out to talk to Airmen about the difference in Federal Law versus Military Law,” said Lauer. “Marijuana is legal in Alaska, but still illegal for military personnel.”

The biggest take-away from this expo is to learn to drink responsibly. It’s imperative for everyone’s safety to know what you’re drinking and to have a plan to be safe and responsible.

“This event is extremely important to bring awareness to the use of alcohol,” said Master Sgt. John Tristian, the 354th MDG first sergeant. “You can be briefed on the subject of responsible drinking a hundred times, but sometimes, until you have hands-on demonstration, it won’t sink in.”