Icewoman in action: celebrating Women's History Month

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, stands with a spreader March 6, 2015, at Fire Station 2, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The spreader is a hydraulic vehicle extrication tool designed to free crash victims from automobile wreckage and other rescues from small spaces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Released)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, stands with a spreader March 6, 2015, at Fire Station 2, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The spreader is a hydraulic vehicle extrication tool designed to free crash victims from automobile wreckage and other rescues from small spaces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Released)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, dons personal protective gear March 6, 2015, at Fire Station 2, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The protective layer is Goodwin’s first line of defense against high heat situations, such as entry into a burning building.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Released)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, dons personal protective gear March 6, 2015, at Fire Station 2, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The protective layer is Goodwin’s first line of defense against high heat situations, such as entry into a burning building. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Released)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, charges a hydrant March 6, 2015, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Goodwin refilled the internal water tank of a P24 fire truck after a nozzle test. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Releasd)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, charges a hydrant March 6, 2015, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Goodwin refilled the internal water tank of a P24 fire truck after a nozzle test. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Releasd)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, deploys a hard line fire hose March 6, 2015, at Fire Station 2, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Goodwin tested the hose nozzle to ensure its operation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Released)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, deploys a hard line fire hose March 6, 2015, at Fire Station 2, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Goodwin tested the hose nozzle to ensure its operation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Released)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, operates a P24 fire truck March 6, 2015, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Goodwin tested the warning lights to ensure proper operation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Released)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, operates a P24 fire truck March 6, 2015, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Goodwin tested the warning lights to ensure proper operation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Released)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, climbs a ladder while performing a leg lock March 6, 2015, at Fire Station 2, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Goodwin demonstrated the leg lock technique used for stability while carrying a support ladder to the roof of a building. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Released)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, climbs a ladder while performing a leg lock March 6, 2015, at Fire Station 2, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Goodwin demonstrated the leg lock technique used for stability while carrying a support ladder to the roof of a building. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Released)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, dons personal protective gear March 6, 2015, at Fire Station 2, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The protective layer is Goodwin’s first line of defense against high heat situations, such as entry into a burning building. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Released)

U.S. Air Force Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, dons personal protective gear March 6, 2015, at Fire Station 2, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The protective layer is Goodwin’s first line of defense against high heat situations, such as entry into a burning building. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Peter Reft/Released)

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Editor's note: This is part of a series celebrating Women's History Month.

I'm Airman 1st Class Kaylee Goodwin, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter.

As a firefighter, I work a 24-hour shift every other day. I respond to any type of emergency, whether it is a medical call, alarm activation or an actual fire. I train every day to keep my skills fresh and learn more effective techniques which can help save time and lives.

Professionally, I am striving to make senior airman below-the-zone and I continue to work to improve myself as an Airman, a firefighter and a person. By the end of this year, I hope to have my Community College of the Air Force degree in fire science and complete most of my requirements for my upgrade training.

Eielson is my first duty station. Since arriving here, I have been involved in new things such as fishing, camping, horseback riding, hiking, canoeing and kayaking. While I am here, I want to take advantage of the opportunities around me.

I always knew I was going to join the service, but I didn't know which branch. I recall having a conversation with my dad when I was in middle school about the National Guard. As my high school career advanced and it was time to start making a decision, I got in contact with retired Chief Master Sgt. Buss who had grown up with my dad. Chief Buss guided me with information on various career paths and gave me great advice that began shaping me into the Airman I have become. These two are the main reason why I am where I am today.

Looking back through history, I imagine some women were perceived as having limits and being "ineffective" in the field. I read that women, at one time, were limited to the types of jobs they could have, as well as where they could work, due to the fact that it was new to allow women in the military and not all the facilities were equipped with female accommodations. I think the public has recognized the effectiveness that women can have in the service, so these issues are no longer relevant.

Women have progressed in our country throughout the years. If it weren't for some strong women to fight for equality in the past, I wouldn't have the job I have now. That means a lot to me. I aim to show other females that we can do the same things as males. I had a job shadow this past month with a young girl in high school who has her heart set on being a firefighter. I was elated that I could show her it's possible and encourage her to chase her dreams.