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On March 29, Eielson broke ground for the F-35A Lightning II flight simulator facility, which marks the beginning of improvements to the base’s infrastructure in order to house the new aircraft. Since Eielson’s selection to be the Air Force’s first operational overseas F-35A location, there has been a lot of work done to prepare for their arrival. Preparations include construction and renovations planned in support of 54 F-35s and approximately 3,500 Airman, contractors and their families. (U.S Air Force photo by Airman Eric M. Fisher) Eielson breaks ground for F-35A Lightning II flight simulator
In April 2015, the Air Force selected Eielson Air Force Base to become the first operational overseas location for the F-35A Lightning II. On March 29, Col. David Mineau, the 354th Fighter Wing commander, officially broke ground for the F-35 beddown; less than a year after the initial selection was made.
0 4/04
2017
A U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon taxis as a Royal Australian Air Force F-18A Hornet takes off at RAAF Williamtown, during Exercise Diamond Shield 2017 in New South Wales, Australia, March 23, 2017. The F-16 and the F-18 served as the primary platforms for providing ‘Red Air’ and ‘Blue Air’ forces, respectively. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty) Know, teach, replicate: 18th AGRS provides world-class training during DS17
It requires remarkable skill, dedication and discipline to become a military pilot. Despite the nation’s colors that don an aircraft’s fuselage, or what service affiliation rests on the chest’s of its aircrew, a military pilot is a capable and readily accessible force for effectively responding to and neutralizing a threat of any magnitude, at any time, or any place. However, like the students of the Royal Australian Air Force Base Air Warfare Instructors Course are learning in Exercise Diamond Shield 2017, it doesn’t come without hard work and extensive exposure to tactical exploitation by some of the most well-trained and experienced fighter combat instructors in the world; the 18th Aggressor Squadron from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska.
0 3/23
2017
A U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon takes off from Royal Australian Air Force Base Williamtown, during Exercise Diamond Shield 2017 in New South Wales, Australia, March 21, 2017. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty) Royal Australian Air Force and 18th Aggressor Squadron pilots continue enhancing interoperability in Exercise Diamond Shield 2017
Pilots from the U.S. Air Force 18th Aggressor Squadron, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, and from Royal Australian Air Force 3 Squadron and the Air Warfare Centre Instructors Course, RAAF Base Williamtown, have already logged numerous hours of flight time during Exercise Diamond Shield 2017 in New South Wales, Australia.
0 3/22
2017
The U.S. Air Force 354th Operations Group F-16 Fighting Falcon flagship sits on the tarmac at Royal Australian Air Force Base Williamtown, in New South Wales, Australia, March 19, 2017. Exercise Diamond Shield 2017, the second of four Diamond Series exercises conducted by the RAAF Air Warfare Centre, is an Australian Defence Force training activity where high-readiness forces deploy quickly to remote locations in Australia in response to a simulated security threat. The exercise will see members of the ADF Navy, Army and Air Force rapidly deploy to counter a fictitious force posing a threat to Australia's national security in the Kimberley region in North Western Australia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty) Under the Australian sky
The U.S. Air Force 18th Aggressor Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcons sit on the tarmac at Royal Australian Air Force Base Williamtown, in New South Wales, Australia, March 19, 2017, during exercise Diamond Shield.
0 3/21
2017
U.S. Air Force Airmen from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, have touched down at Royal Australian Air Force Base Williamtown, in New South Wales, Australia, for Exercise Diamond Shield 2017. Exercise DS17, the second of four Diamond Series exercises conducted by the RAAF Air Warfare Centre, is an Australian Defence Force training activity where high-readiness forces deploy quickly to remote locations in Australia in response to a simulated security threat. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty) 18th Aggressor pilots take to the Australian air for Exercise Diamond Shield
U.S. Air Force Airmen from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, have touched down at Royal Australian Air Force Base Williamtown, in New South Wales, Australia, for Exercise Diamond Shield 2017.
0 3/20
2017
U.S. Air Force Airman Isaac Johnson, a 354th Fighter Wing photojournalist, passes his Common Access Card to Airman 1st Class Kritydra Thomas, a 354th Security Forces Squadron entry controller, on Jan. 20, 2017, at Hursey Gate on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Beginning June 6, 2017, the Alaska state driver's license will be denied entry to federal installations without escort as mandated by the REAL ID Act of 2005. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eric M. Fisher) EAFB installation access changes with REAL ID Act requirements
To comply with federal law, Eielson Air Force Base will no longer accept state-issued identification from certain U.S. states for unescorted visitor access to the installation as mandated under the REAL ID Act. Visitors who are not in compliance will be denied unescorted entry to federal installations and will require a Common Access Card/dependent/retiree identification holder to escort them at all times. Personnel in possession of a valid Department of Defense issued identification card are not affected by this change.
0 1/20
2017
U.S. Air Force 1st. Lt. Andrew Heard, the 354th Contracting Squadron services and commodities flight commander, takes a break from climbing Denali, in Interior Alaska on July 29, 2016. At 20,308 feet above sea level, Denali is the tallest mountain in North America. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st. Lt. Andrew Heard) ‘Aim High’: Airman stands on top of continent
At 20,308 feet above sea level, Denali is considered one of the most challenging peaks to conquer in the world. Thousands of people have tried, and failed, to reach the top. On June 16, 1st Lt. Andrew Heard, the 354th Contracting Squadron services and commodities flight commander, climbed the tallest peak in North America. For Heard, being able to stand on top of one of the most prominent peaks in the world began as a dream two years earlier.
0 8/01
2016
Maj. Scott Meng, 18th Aggressor Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot, awaits take-off authorization during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, June 15, 2016. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises that enable joint and international forces to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties together in a realistic threat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty) 18th AMU secure jets for Red Flag-Alaska
Maj. Scott Meng, 18th Aggressor Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot, awaits take-off authorization during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, June 15, 2016. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises that enable joint and international forces to sharpen their combat skills by
0 6/15
2016
U.S. Air Force Captain’s Karan Bansal, left, and Kyle McCullough, KC-135 Stratotanker pilots assigned to the 909th Air Refueling Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan, orient to the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, May 12, 2016. The JPARC consists of all the land, air, sea, space and cyberspace used for military training in Alaska, providing unmatched opportunities for present and future Service, joint, interagency and multinational training and is comprised of approximately 65,000 square miles of available airspace, 2,490 square miles of land space with 1.5 million acres of maneuver land and 42,000 square nautical miles of sea and airspace in the Gulf of Alaska. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty) Essential players in RED FLAG-Alaska exercise
U.S. Air Force Captain’s Karan Bansal, left, and Kyle McCullough, KC-135 Stratotanker pilots assigned to the 909th Air Refueling Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan, orient to the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, May 12, 2016. The JPARC consists of all the land, air, sea, space and cyberspace used for military training in Alaska, providing
0 5/16
2016
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jonathan McCullough, an 8th Operations Support Squadron aircrew flight equipment (AFE) journeyman assigned to Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, performs maintenance on an oxygen mask, May 2, 2016, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. AFE technicians must perform extensive work on each piece of equipment to ensure maximum safety for pilots. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released) Aircrew flight equipment: no masking safety
While pilots fly at the speed of sound, multi-tasking is in full force, but safety remains a top priority in the skies. Maintenance Airmen make sure each aircraft is ready to fly, but one crew works meticulously behind the scenes to ensure each pilot’s flight equipment is in top working condition.
0 5/10
2016
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