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Iceman in Action: Senior Airman Jonathan Sikora

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Johnathan Sikora, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron structural journeyman, helps build an obstacle course Nov. 16, 2016, at the Baker Field House on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Sikora had experience in construction prior to joining the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Isaac Johnson)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Johnathan Sikora, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron structural journeyman, helps build an obstacle course Nov. 16, 2016, at the Baker Field House on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Sikora had experience in construction prior to joining the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Isaac Johnson)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Johnathan Sikora, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron structural journeyman, gives feedback from a Green Dot class Dec. 6, 2016, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. As a Green Dot instructor, Sikora helps the Air Force change the culture regarding inter-personal violence. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Isaac Johnson)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Johnathan Sikora, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron structural journeyman, gives feedback from a Green Dot class Dec. 6, 2016, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. As a Green Dot instructor, Sikora helps the Air Force change the culture regarding inter-personal violence. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Isaac Johnson)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Johnathan Sikora, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron structural journeyman, takes a brief break Dec. 6, 2016, at the Baker Field House on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Sikora says every day he tries to better himself and nobody should cap their potential in life. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Isaac Johnson)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Johnathan Sikora, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron structural journeyman, takes a brief break Dec. 6, 2016, at the Baker Field House on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Sikora says every day he tries to better himself and nobody should cap their potential in life. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Isaac Johnson)

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska --

Just like building a house, when constructing a better life you must start with a quality foundation. Unlike building a house, a toolset needed for life cannot be bought.

 

Senior Airman Jonathan Sikora, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron structural journeyman, is a builder by trade, but does much more than construction.

 

Sikora joined the Air Force in 2014, in an open general career choice. Prior to the Air Force, he had a job as a construction worker and wasn’t sure if he would be able to do the same thing in the military.

 

“People might be deterred from joining the military because there is a fear they will not be able to do something they love,” said Sikora. “I didn’t know what career field I would get into, but I took a chance and now wake up to a job I am still excited to do.”

 

Some Airmen may believe their job is less important than others, but just like many studs in a wall keep it from collapsing, every job contributes to the success of the mission.

 

“Being a contracting officer representative enables me to build relationships with contractors and find the best deals to try and save the Air Force money,” said Sikora. “Contractors that need to get on base to build or repair facilities for military personnel can’t do their job if they don’t have funding and the right documents.”

 

Aside from learning multiple areas of his career field, Sikora serves as a Green Dot mentor to build up the Airmen of Eielson in multiple ways.

 

“The purpose behind Green Dot is to start a culture change in the Air Force,” said Sikora. “We want everyone to be aware and stand up to situations and behaviors that can be harmful to others.”

 

Bad things can happen anywhere, but situations can often be prevented. As a Green Dot instructor, Sikora provides guidance on how to recognize potential Red Dot situations.

 

“I enjoy spreading positivity to others,” said Sikora. “I don't like interpersonal violence at all, so being able to teach and implement the training is very rewarding.”

 

Sikora is a “man of many hats.” He does his part to make sure Eielson is better while also taking the necessary steps to build a better life for himself.

 

“Every day I try to better myself; whether running faster or eating healthier,” said Sikora. “I was recently put into a new position. It’s different, but good because it has to do with construction management and that’s what I’m getting my degree in. I always tell myself to never cap my potential and I don't think anyone should.”