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Dirt Boyz

Snowfall data is displayed on a board at the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy vehicle equipment shop Dec. 6, 2018 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Less than 200 mile from the Arctic Circle, Eielson Air Force Base is one of the northern most installations in the service. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

Snowfall data is displayed on a board at the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy vehicle equipment shop Dec. 6, 2018, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Less than 200 miles from the Arctic Circle, Eielson Air Force Base is one of the northern most installations in the service. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

Snowfall data is displayed on a board at the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy vehicle equipment shop Dec. 6, 2018 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Less than 200 mile from the Arctic Circle, Eielson Air Force Base is one of the northern most installations in the service. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

A snow blower drives past five KC-135R Stratotankers on the taxi way Dec. 6, 2018, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Located in interior Alaska, Eielson AFB experiences some of the most extreme temperatures in the country regularly reaching sub-zero temperatures and averaging upwards of 65 inches of snow every year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

Snowfall data is displayed on a board at the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy vehicle equipment shop Dec. 6, 2018 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Less than 200 mile from the Arctic Circle, Eielson Air Force Base is one of the northern most installations in the service. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

U.S. Air Force Tech Sgt. Justin Lindbloom, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy equipment operator, removes snow from the taxiway using a snow blower Dec. 6, 2018, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The Dirt Boyz are charged with maintaining the Eielson flight line and ensuring it is operationally safe for aircraft to take off and land. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

Snowfall data is displayed on a board at the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy vehicle equipment shop Dec. 6, 2018 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Less than 200 mile from the Arctic Circle, Eielson Air Force Base is one of the northern most installations in the service. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

U.S. Air Force Tech Sgt. Justin Lindbloom, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy equipment operator, removes snow from the taxiway using a snow blower Dec. 6, 2018, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The Dirt Boyz are charged with maintaining the Eielson flight line and ensuring it is operationally safe for aircraft to take off and land. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

Snowfall data is displayed on a board at the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy vehicle equipment shop Dec. 6, 2018 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Less than 200 mile from the Arctic Circle, Eielson Air Force Base is one of the northern most installations in the service. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Justin Lindbloom, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy equipment operator, performs an operations check on a snow plow Dec. 6, 2018, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Heavy equipment operators, also known as Dirt Boyz, are responsible for maintaining the base infrastructure including the airfield year-round. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

Snowfall data is displayed on a board at the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy vehicle equipment shop Dec. 6, 2018 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Less than 200 mile from the Arctic Circle, Eielson Air Force Base is one of the northern most installations in the service. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Justin Lindbloom is a heavy equipment operator assigned to the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Nicknamed “Dirt Boyz” the heavy equipment operators use a variety of vehicles to ensure the installation’s roads and airfield are clear and safe year-round. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

Snowfall data is displayed on a board at the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy vehicle equipment shop Dec. 6, 2018 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Less than 200 mile from the Arctic Circle, Eielson Air Force Base is one of the northern most installations in the service. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

U.S. Air Force Tech Sgt. Justin Lindbloom, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy equipment operator, gets into a vehicle Dec. 6, 2018, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The Dirt Boyz are charged with maintaining the Eielson flight line and ensuring it is operationally safe for aircraft to take off and land. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

Snowfall data is displayed on a board at the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy vehicle equipment shop Dec. 6, 2018 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Less than 200 mile from the Arctic Circle, Eielson Air Force Base is one of the northern most installations in the service. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Justin Lindbloom, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy equipment operator, switches on snow plow lights prior to driving on the airfield Dec. 6, 2018, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The Dirt Boyz are charged with maintaining the Eielson flight line and ensuring it is operationally safe for aircraft to take off and land. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jerilyn Quintanilla)

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska --