HomeNewsArticle Display

Give moose their space

A baby moose and its mother peer into a window at the child development center Feb. 27. As the weather begins to warm up, parents are reminded to talk to their children about moose safety. (Photo by Jennifer Weaver)

A baby moose and its mother peer into a window at the child development center Feb. 27. As the weather begins to warm up, parents are reminded to talk to their children about moose safety. (Photo by Jennifer Weaver)

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Airmen and their families are often concerned about close encounters with moose. Historically, moose are not aggressive but will defend themselves if they perceive a threat. When people act carelessly and don't see moose as potentially dangerous, they may approach too closely and put themselves at risk. 

Several moose live on Eielson; therefore, parents need to take extra precautions to ensure children know what to do when they see a moose. 

Moose blend in well to their environment and can be surprisingly hard to see despite being such large animals. Unlike other wildlife, moose are likely to stand their ground even when they hear people approaching. 

Moose safety tips:

● Never put yourself between a cow (female adult moose) and a calf (young moose). Adult moose are extremely defensive of their young. Furthermore, don't walk toward a moose if it can be avoided.Try to remain at least 50 feet away. 

● Never throw anything, including rocks, bottles, trash, or snowballs, at a moose. 

● Always keep pets under control, or keep them secure at home. A dog may chase after a moose and suddenly find the moose chasing it. 

● Avoid moose that are in a fenced area or between houses; they may feel cornered. 

● Try to get behind a tree if a moose charges. An individual has better agility to move around a tree compared to a moose. 

(Information courtesy of the National Park Service)