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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Corey Holt and Senior Airman Shane Sells, both assigned to the 8th Maintenance Squadron, Kunsan Air Base (AB) Republic of Korea, and Staff Sgt. Corey Holt, assigned to the 35th Maintenance Squadron, Misawa AB, Japan, all aircrew egress systems technicians, work together to install an ejection seat that was proving to be difficult to bolt-in on an F-16D Fighting Falcon aircraft Aug. 9, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-3 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. By working together, even though they are from different bases in the Indo-Asia-Pacific, they saved 50 percent on man-hours and sharpened their combat skills by working in the exercise aimed at creating a realistic threat environment at simulated forward operating bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Corey Holt and Senior Airman Shane Sells, both assigned to the 8th Maintenance Squadron, Kunsan Air Base (AB), Republic of Korea, and Staff Sgt. Corey Holt, assigned to the 35th Maintenance Squadron, Misawa AB, Japan, all aircrew egress systems technicians, celebrate after bolting an injection seat that was difficult to reach into an F-16D Fighting Falcon aircraft Aug. 9, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-3 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The maintenance Airmen combined skills, saving 50 percent on man-hours and temporary duty funds, increasing coverage from 12 to 24 hours during RF-A 16-3. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Corey Holt, an aircrew egress systems craftsman assigned to the 35th Maintenance Squadron, Misawa Air Base, Japan, holds an ejection seat still in an F-16D Fighting Falcon aircraft while Staff Sgt. Shawn Layou, an aircrew egress systems craftsman assigned to the 8th Maintenance Squadron, Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea, bolts it into place Aug. 9, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-3 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Units from across the Department of Defense and partner nations send units to Eielson for RF-A to train for contingency operations in a controlled environment stressing joint and multinational integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Shawn Layou, an aircrew egress systems craftsman assigned to the 8th Maintenance Squadron, Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, bolts into place to secure an ejection seat in an F-16D Fighting Falcon aircraft Aug. 9, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-3 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. This exercise provides unique opportunities to integrate various forces into joint, coalition and multilateral training from simulated forward operating bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Corey Holt, an aircrew egress systems craftsman assigned to the 35th Maintenance Squadron, Misawa Air Base (AB), Japan, holds an ejection seat still in an F-16D Fighting Falcon aircraft while Staff Sgt. Shawn Layou, an aircrew egress systems craftsman assigned to the 8th Maintenance Squadron, Kunsan AB, Republic of Korea, bolts it into place Aug. 9, 2016 during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-3 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. By working together, even though they are from different bases in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region, they sharpen their combat skills by working in the exercise, which is aimed at creating a realistic threat environment at simulated forward operating bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Troy Moncrief, a 354th Civil Engineering Squadron wastewater apprentice, walks down the hall of the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, wastewater treatment plant July 14, 2016. Moncrief compares the underground portion of the plant to a submarine with its low hanging pipes, ladders, and tight spaces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Troy Moncrief, a 354th Civil Engineering Squadron wastewater apprentice, uses a boat to inspect aeration equipment in ponds at the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, wastewater treatment plant July 15, 2016. The manufactured holding pond lined with thick black plastic hold millions of gallons of waste that is treated in a week’s time after it enters the plant. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Troy Moncrief, a 354th Civil Engineering Squadron wastewater apprentice, uses a boat to inspect aeration equipment in ponds at the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, wastewater treatment plant July 15, 2016. The manufactured holding pond lined with thick black plastic hold millions of gallons of waste that is treated in a week’s time after it enters the plant. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Troy Moncrief, a 354th Civil Engineering Squadron wastewater apprentice, displays solids removed from sewage after he removed it from a trap underground at the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, wastewater treatment plant July 14, 2016. Anything that cant be treated by aeration, bacteria or chemicals is removed prior to entering settling tanks and ponds. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Troy Moncrief, a 354th Civil Engineering Squadron wastewater apprentice, displays solids removed from sewage after he removed it from a trap underground at the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, wastewater treatment plant July 14, 2016. Anything that cant be treated by aeration, bacteria or chemicals is removed prior to entering settling tanks and ponds. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Maj. Brian Bragg, the 18th Aggressor Squadron assistant director of operations, reads maintenance continuity reports prior to take off as a “bad guy” for a sortie June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. RF-A, a U.S. Pacific Air Forces commander-directed exercise, has helped train more than 150,000 aircrew members for combat in the past 40 years. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Maj. Brian Bragg, the 18th Aggressor Squadron assistant director of operations, waits with his hand in a safe position while crew chiefs from the 354th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron prepare the F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter aircraft to take off as a “bad guy” for a sortie June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The average Aggressor pilot has at least 1,000 fighter hours and hundreds of hours of studying to become experts in enemy tactics used to train U.S. Air Force, joint and coalition partners during the U.S. Pacific Air Forces commander-directed RF-A exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Maj. Brian Bragg, the 18th Aggressor Squadron assistant director of operations, uses hand signals to communicate with crew chiefs from the 354th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron while they prepare an F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter aircraft to take off as the “bad guy” for a sortie June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. RF-A exercises keep fighters in the air through 10 simulated combat sorties flying over the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, a more than 67,000 square mile airspace that includes one conventional bombing range and two tactical bombing ranges containing 510 different types of targets and 45 threat simulators. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Micah Bell, the 354th Operations Support Squadron commander, fills out flight paperwork at the 18th Aggressor Squadron operations desk prior to a a sortie June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Pilots from Eielson take on the role of Red Air “bad guys” during large scale exercises and train Blue Air pilots during RF-A. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Capt. Todd Possemato, an 18th Aggressor Squadron pilot, flies an F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter aircraft May 12, 2016, as a “bad guy” for a sortie during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-1 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The average Aggressor pilot has at least 1,000 fighter hours and hundreds of hours of studying to become experts in enemy tactics used to train U.S. Air Force, joint and coalition partners during U.S. Pacific Air Forces commander-directed RF-A exercises. (U.S. Air Force photo/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Demonte Outlaw, a 354th Operations Support Squadron aircrew flight equipment journeyman, maintains helmets used by pilots with the 18th Aggressor Squadron (AGRS), June 15, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The 18th AGRS use a red star on their helmets to mark the mission of being experts in enemy tactics in exercises such as RF-A, a U.S. Pacific Air Forces commander-directed exercise, which has helped train more than 150,000 aircrew members for combat in the past 40 years. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel/Released)
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