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U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Karen Grinder, a 354th Contracting Squadron contracting administrator, poses for a photo Sept. 13, 2016, at her home in North Pole, Alaska. Behind her is her fabric closet, which holds roughly 1200 yards of fabric. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cassandra Whitman) Stitched with love
A reminiscent Senior Airman Karen Grinder imagines her 5-year-old-self learning how to hand stitch. In her grandmother’s eyes, a child was too young to use the sewing machine, so she would trace a 1/4 inch seam allowance and let Grinder stitch them together. “If it wasn’t even, straight or small enough stitches, she would undo it all and I would have to re-stitch it,” said Grinder.
0 9/15
2016
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Taylor Boodooram, a 354th Medical Support Squadron medical information systems technician, takes a brief break Sept. 7, 2016, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Boodooram said her favorite part of her job is being able to support and assist those around her both on- and off-duty. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Isaac Johnson) Iceman in Action: Airman 1st Class Taylor Boodooram
Rank and Name: Airman 1st Class Taylor Shania Boodooram Duty Title: Medical information systems technician, 354th Medical Support Squadron Hometown: Teaneck, N.J.
0 9/12
2016
Emergency Medical Technicians from Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., treat a car accident trauma patient during the 2016 EMT Rodeo Aug. 25, 2016, at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. Cannon’s EMT Rodeo tests the skills of medical professionals from across the Air Force through a series of innovative high-pressure scenarios. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Eboni Reams/Released) EMT Rodeo 2016
U.S. Air Force Emergency Medical Technicians gathered to compete in the 9th annual Air Force Medical Service EMT Rodeo at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., Aug. 24-27, 2016.The two and a half day competition involved 24 EMT teams from across the Air Force, both CONUS and OCONUS installations challenging one another for the title of the “Best of the
0 9/06
2016
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Timothy Fitzpatrick, a 354th Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle maintenance journeyman, reroutes an electrical wire on a snow plow Aug. 26, 2016, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. During the winter it is important the snow plows can work to keep roads  drivable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Isaac Johnson)
Iceman in action: Airman 1st Class Timothy Fitzpatrick
Rank and Name: Airman 1st Class Timothy Fitzpatrick Duty Title: Vehicle Maintenance Journeyman Hometown: Plymouth, Mass.
0 8/29
2016
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Eric McComb and U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Andrew Markham, both Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) technicians with the 103rd Weapons of Mass Destruction-Civil Support Team (WMD-CST), out of Kulis Air National Guard Base, Alaska, walk toward a building with potential CBRN threats Aug. 23, 2016, at the Fairbanks Regional Fire Training Center in Fairbanks, Alaska. The 103rd WMD-CST is a joint unit thats includes both Alaska Air National Guard and Alaska Army National Guard. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Isaac Johnson)
Alaska Army National Guard supports community with multi-agency exercise
The 103rd Weapons of Mass Destruction-Civil Support Team, composed of Alaska Army National Guard Soldiers and Alaska Air National Guard Airmen, hosted an exercise in Fairbanks, Alaska, Aug. 23 for different agencies in the area including Eielson Air Force Base and Fort Wainwright. The exercise provided an opportunity for different agencies to train together on Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Environmental agents.
0 8/26
2016
Department of the Air Force Jack Waid, the 354th Fighter Wing historian, stands with his wife, Jami and sons, Robert and Joshua in the Base Exchange atrium April 22, 2016, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The Waid family supports Robert, who creates and sells many pieces of artwork and raises awareness about autism. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor) Creating art through an autistic eye
Autism Awareness Month is formally recognized in April, but one family goes all-in to raise awareness about the disorder year-round. Members of the Waid family are often seen standing together, supporting their 20-year-old son Robert, who uses his artistic talents to educate people about how he lives a high-functioning life with autism. Robert and his family don’t view his autism as a disability, they see it as an opportunity to raise awareness and show people what autistic individuals are capable of.
0 8/24
2016
Tech. Sgt. Laronica Docken, 92nd Air Refueling Wing command support staff, reads over a memorandum from the Secretary of the Air Force titled “Reducing Additional Duties,” Aug. 19, 2016, at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash. As the first step in a long-term effort to reduce the burden on Airmen and allow them more time to focus on core missions, the Air Force conducted an assessment of each of the 61 additional duties identified under Air Force Instruction 38-206, “Additional Duty Management.” Based on this review, 29 of the 61 duties will be adjusted in a way that reduces the workload for Airmen. “We all must commit to making continuous improvements to reduce excessive demands on Airmen’s time,” said Deborah Lee James, Secretary of the Air Force. Airmen can expect these changes no later than Oct. 1, 2016.” (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Taylor Shelton) AF to reduce additional duties
WASHINGTON (AFNS) – Airmen need more time to focus on their core missions In a memorandum to Airmen released Aug. 19, Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James and Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Dave Goldfein announced the service has established a task force titled “Airmen’s Time,” charged with streamlining, and in some cases eliminating, additional duties.
0 8/23
2016
U.S. Air Force Col. Brian Toth, the 354th Operations Group commander, passes the 354th Operations Support Squadron (OSS) guidon to Lt. Col. Matthew Belle, the new 354th OSS commander, Aug. 19, 2016, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Lt. Col. Micah Bell, the outgoing squadron commander, will remain at the 354th OSS as the director of operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cassandra Whitman) 354th OSS Change of Command
U.S. Air Force Col. Brian Toth, the 354th Operations Group commander, passes the 354th Operations Support Squadron (OSS) guidon to Lt. Col. Matthew Belle, the new 354th OSS commander, Aug. 19, 2016, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Lt. Col. Micah Bell, the outgoing squadron commander, will remain at the 354th OSS as the director of operations.
0 8/22
2016
U.S. Navy Lt. Samuel Deedy, a pilot assigned to Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 135, Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island, Wash., seats himself in an EA-18G Growler aircraft along with Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Flt. Lt. Conrad Stalling, an electronic warfare officer assigned to RAAF Base Williamtown, New South Wales, attached to VAQ-135, NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., Aug. 16, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-3, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Deedy was born and raised in Wasilla, Alaska, and said he ahs dreamt of becoming a pilot for as long as he can remember. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Cassandra Whitman) Childhood dream becomes reality for Navy pilot
Binoculars in hand, a young Lt. Samuel Deedy rushed outside when he heard the roar of engines in the sky. He lived under the flight path of fighter jets and could name every one that passed. Sam was born and raised in Wasilla, Alaska, and he said ever since he can remember, he wanted to fly. Dana Deedy, Sam’s mother, said she couldn’t pinpoint a specific event that happened, but she and her husband Dan always knew he’d become a pilot.
0 8/22
2016
A U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor multi-role fighter aircraft assigned to the 525th Fighter Squadron out of Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, receives fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker refueling aircraft assigned to the 927th Air Refueling Wing, MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., Aug. 16, 2016, in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-3. During air refueling a boom operator is responsible for making sure aircraft are refueled properly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Isaac Johnson)

Here comes the boom
Laying down soaring through the sky clouds are visible as far as the eye can see. In the distance appears a speck, which grows larger by the second, finally becoming recognizable as an aircraft. Now the hard part begins. Both aircraft move at hundreds of miles per hour and it’s the boom operator’s responsibility to “thread the needle” and refuel the approaching aircraft from 28 to 47 feet away. Boom operators are essential to RED FLAG-Alaska exercises; they refuel aircraft from different participating units, and take care of other duties that happen behind the cockpit.
0 8/19
2016
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