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Arctic Survival: “Coolest” training in the Air Force

The five-day course teaches the basic survival skills such as preparing fire wood, building a fire with minimal tools and resources, catching food and signaling methods.

Staff Sgt. Zachary Rumke, a Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape specialist assigned to the Arctic Survival Training school, reviews different types of cold-weather injuries March 20, 2019, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The first two days of the five-day course consisted of classroom instruction during which students learn about the various challenges of the Arctic environment and how to overcome them. (U.S. Air Force photo Airman Aaron Guerrisky)

The five-day course teaches the basic survival skills such as preparing fire wood, building a fire with minimal tools and resources, catching food and signaling methods.

Arctic Survival Training students practice signaling with flares March 22, 2019, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The five-day course teaches the basic survival skills such as preparing fire wood, building a fire with minimal tools and resources, catching food and signaling methods. (U.S. Air Force photo Airman Aaron Guerrisky)

The five-day course teaches the basic survival skills such as preparing fire wood, building a fire with minimal tools and resources, catching food and signaling methods.

Arctic Survival Training students cut fire wood March 20, 2019, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The purpose of Arctic Survival Training is equip students with basic survival skills and give them an opportunity to test their knowledge and abilities in the Arctic environment. (U.S. Air Force photo Airman Aaron Guerrisky)

The five-day course teaches the basic survival skills such as preparing fire wood, building a fire with minimal tools and resources, catching food and signaling methods.

Arctic Survival Training students throw branches atop a fire March 22, 2019, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The course, also known as “Cool School,” originated in Nome, Alaska in 1947. Since then thousands of military members and Department of Defense civilian employees have made their way to Alaska to learn how to survive in the Arctic. (U.S. Air Force photo Airman Aaron Guerrisky)

The five-day course teaches the basic survival skills such as preparing fire wood, building a fire with minimal tools and resources, catching food and signaling methods.

An Arctic Survival Training student lights a flare onto a signaling fire March 22, 2019, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The first two days of the five-day course consists of classroom instruction and laboratory training followed by the field training portion in which they must apply the lessons learned. (U.S. Air Force photo Airman Aaron Guerrisky)

The five-day course teaches the basic survival skills such as preparing fire wood, building a fire with minimal tools and resources, catching food and signaling methods.

An Arctic Survival Training student utilizes a flare to signal rescue personnel March 22, 2019, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. For 72 years, the Arctic Survival School has taught thousands of military personnel vital skills to help them survive in the world’s harshest Arctic environments. (U.S. Air Force photo Airman Aaron Guerrisky)

The five-day course teaches the basic survival skills such as preparing fire wood, building a fire with minimal tools and resources, catching food and signaling methods.

A UH-60 Black Hawk, assigned to the Alaska Army National Guard, hovers over a rescue pickup point as part of an Arctic Survival Training lesson March 22, 2019, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Arctic Survival Training is a five-day course designed to teach students the techniques and skills essential to survive in the harsh Arctic environment. (U.S. Air Force photo Airman Aaron Guerrisky)

The five-day course teaches the basic survival skills such as preparing fire wood, building a fire with minimal tools and resources, catching food and signaling methods.

An Arctic Survival Training student carves off shavings of wood March 20, 2019, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. During the five-day course, students learn about medical procedures, personal protection, food and water procurement, and signaling methods. (U.S. Air Force photo Airman Aaron Guerrisky)

The five-day course teaches the basic survival skills such as preparing fire wood, building a fire with minimal tools and resources, catching food and signaling methods.

Arctic Survival Training students cut down a tree March 20, 2019, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The first two days of the five-day course consists of classroom instruction and laboratory training followed by the field training portion in which they must apply the lessons learned. (U.S. Air Force photo Airman Aaron Guerrisky)

The five-day course teaches the basic survival skills such as preparing fire wood, building a fire with minimal tools and resources, catching food and signaling methods.
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Staff Sgt. Zachary Rumke, a Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape specialist assigned to the Arctic Survival Training school, demonstrates how to start a fire March 20, 2019, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. To ensure the most realistic training possible, the course is held only during the winter months when temperatures can drop to -60 degrees Fahrenheit. (U.S. Air Force photo Airman Aaron Guerrisky)

The five-day course teaches the basic survival skills such as preparing fire wood, building a fire with minimal tools and resources, catching food and signaling methods.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 11

Arctic Survival Training students cut wood and build fires March 20, 2019, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The course, also known as “Cool School,” originated in Nome, Alaska in 1947. Since then thousands of military members and Department of Defense civilian employees have made their way to Alaska to learn how to survive in the Arctic. (U.S. Air Force photo Airman Aaron Guerrisky)

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska --