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From snow to sand 18th AGRS increase readiness across Air Force

U.S. Air Force Capt. Garret Wilson, 18th Aggressor Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot, the taxis on a runway Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 28, 2019. Eight F-16s flew to Nellis AFB, Nevada to support of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Instructor Course. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Larue Guerrisky)

U.S. Air Force Capt. Garret Wilson, 18th Aggressor Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot, the taxis on a runway Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 28, 2019. Eight F-16s flew to Nellis AFB, Nevada to support of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Instructor Course. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Larue Guerrisky)

U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons from 18th Aggressor Squadron are lined up on the flight line at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 6, 2019. Eielson AFB sent a mobile training team, consisting of eight F-16s, to Nellis in support of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Instructor Course. (U.S. Air Force photo by Nellis Air Force Base Public Affairs)

U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons from 18th Aggressor Squadron are lined up on the flight line at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 6, 2019. Eielson AFB sent a mobile training team, consisting of eight F-16s, to Nellis in support of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Instructor Course. (U.S. Air Force photo by Nellis Air Force Base Public Affairs)

A U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon from the 18th Aggressor Squadron takes off at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 6, 2019. The 18th AGRS utilizes a mobile training team that gives them opportunities to travel to another base and prepare Combat Air Force, joint and allied aircrews on how to fight and overcome a realistic adversary. (U.S. Air Force photo by Nellis Air Force Base Public Affairs)

A U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon from the 18th Aggressor Squadron takes off at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 6, 2019. The 18th AGRS utilizes a mobile training team that gives them opportunities to travel to another base and prepare Combat Air Force, joint and allied aircrews on how to fight and overcome a realistic adversary. (U.S. Air Force photo by Nellis Air Force Base Public Affairs)

U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons from 18th Aggressor Squadron fly over the flight line at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 6, 2019. The Aggressor’s mission is to know, teach, and replicate a threat in order for other pilots to be able to overcome their adversaries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Nellis Air Force Base Public Affairs)

U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons from 18th Aggressor Squadron fly over the flight line at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 6, 2019. The Aggressor’s mission is to know, teach, and replicate a threat in order for other pilots to be able to overcome their adversaries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Nellis Air Force Base Public Affairs)

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska --

Eielson Air Force Base’s 18th Aggressor Squadron sent a mobile training team, consisting of eight F-16 Fighting Falcons, to Nellis AFB, Nevada, in support of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Instructor Course Oct. 21, 2019.

The MTT gives the Aggressors opportunities to travel to another base and prepare Combat Air Forces, joint and allied aircrews on how to fight and overcome a realistic adversary.

“The MTT allows the 18th Aggressor squadron to execute flying operations in an off-station environment, and provides adversary threat training to diverse audiences,” said Lt. Col. Jason Monaco, 18th AGRS commander.

The Aggressor’s mission is to know, teach, and replicate a threat in order for other pilots to be able to overcome their adversaries.

“We bring some of the most advanced jamming equipment to fight against our front-line fighters,” said Capt. Daniel Thompson, 18th AGRS director of academics. “The CAF’s understanding of the adversary grows as a result.”

During this trip to the desert, the 18th acted as enemy aircraft against the current Weapons School class. The Aggressors flew against F-16, F-15E Strike Eagle, F-22 Raptor and F-35A Lightning II airframes.

After completing their portion of training the weapons school class, the MTT returned from the desert sand Nov. 8, back to the Alaskan Arctic.