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Navy mechanics keep Growlers in the air during RF-A 21-1

U.S. Navy aircraft mechanics assigned to the Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 perform maintenance on an EA-18G Growler during RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1 on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 13, 2020. RED FLAG-Alaska exercises are designed to provide training for deployed aircrew, maintenance and support personnel in sustainment of large-force deployed air operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Beaux Hebert)

U.S. Navy aircraft mechanics assigned to the Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 perform maintenance on an EA-18G Growler during RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1 on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 13, 2020. RED FLAG-Alaska exercises are designed to provide training for deployed aircrew, maintenance and support personnel in sustainment of large-force deployed air operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Beaux Hebert)

U.S. Navy aircraft mechanic assigned to the Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 inspects an EA-18G Growler prior to launch during RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1 on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 13, 2020. RED FLAG-Alaska provides unique opportunities to integrate various forces into joint training from simulated forward operating bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Beaux Hebert)

U.S. Navy aircraft mechanic assigned to the Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 inspects an EA-18G Growler prior to launch during RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1 on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 13, 2020. RED FLAG-Alaska provides unique opportunities to integrate various forces into joint training from simulated forward operating bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Beaux Hebert)

A U.S. Navy aircraft mechanic assigned to the Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 tightens a rivet on an EA-18G Growler during RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1 on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 13, 2020. Across all branches of the U.S. military, aircraft maintenance requires the utmost attention to detail to ensure that all jets are safe and ready to fly at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Beaux Hebert)

A U.S. Navy aircraft mechanic assigned to the Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 tightens a rivet on an EA-18G Growler during RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1 on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 13, 2020. Across all branches of the U.S. military, aircraft maintenance requires the utmost attention to detail to ensure that all jets are safe and ready to fly at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Beaux Hebert)

A U.S. Navy aircraft mechanic assigned to the Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 marshals an EA-18G Growler during RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1 on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 13, 2020. The EA-18G is an advanced airborne electronic attack aircraft, capable of operating from an aircraft carrier as well as land-bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Beaux Hebert)

A U.S. Navy aircraft mechanic assigned to the Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 marshals an EA-18G Growler during RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1 on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 13, 2020. The EA-18G is an advanced airborne electronic attack aircraft, capable of operating from an aircraft carrier as well as land-bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Beaux Hebert)

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- U.S. Navy aircraft mechanics assigned to the Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 perform maintenance on an EA-18G Growler during RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1 on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 13, 2020. RED FLAG-Alaska exercises are designed to provide training for deployed aircrew, maintenance and support personnel in sustainment of large-force deployed air operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Beaux Hebert)