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Ice Bridge

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Timothy Ristow, 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, drives a Small Unit Support Vehicle with a grader to smooth out a road for access to the Blair Lake Bombing Range Facilities Dec. 13. The ice bridge takes about five weeks to complete in sub-zero weather. It is five-foot deep, a mile long and capable of supporting more than 110 tons -- which completely vanishes a few months later. The ice bridge helps 354th CES members access and perform annual maintenance on Eielson's training and bombing ranges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jonathan Snyder).
(Released)

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Timothy Ristow, 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, drives a Small Unit Support Vehicle with a grader to smooth out a road for access to the Blair Lake Bombing Range Facilities Dec. 13. The ice bridge takes about five weeks to complete in sub-zero weather. It is five-foot deep, a mile long and capable of supporting more than 110 tons -- which completely vanishes a few months later. The ice bridge helps 354th CES members access and perform annual maintenance on Eielson's training and bombing ranges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jonathan Snyder). (Released)

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Staff Sgt. Timothy Hardman, 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, dumps snow and ice into a slough in order to finish an ice bridge used to gain access to the Blair Lake Bombing Range Facilities Dec. 13. The ice bridge takes about five weeks to complete in sub-zero weather. It is five-foot deep, a mile long and capable of supporting more than 110 tons -- which completely vanishes a few months later. The ice bridge helps 354th CES members access and perform annual maintenance on Eielson's training and bombing ranges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jonathan Snyder).

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Staff Sgt. Timothy Hardman, 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, dumps snow and ice into a slough in order to finish an ice bridge used to gain access to the Blair Lake Bombing Range Facilities Dec. 13. The ice bridge takes about five weeks to complete in sub-zero weather. It is five-foot deep, a mile long and capable of supporting more than 110 tons -- which completely vanishes a few months later. The ice bridge helps 354th CES members access and perform annual maintenance on Eielson's training and bombing ranges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jonathan Snyder).

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Master Sgt. Andy Harper and Tech. Sgt. Scott Fletcher, both from the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, use an auger to measure the ice thickness. If the ice is not thick enough, water pumps will be placed in the drilled hole to help build the ice bridge. The ice bridge takes about five weeks to complete in sub-zero weather. It is five-foot deep, a mile long and capable of supporting more than 110 tons -- which completely vanishes a few months later. The ice bridge helps 354th CES members access and perform annual maintenance on Eielson?s training and bombing ranges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jonathan Snyder).

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Master Sgt. Andy Harper and Tech. Sgt. Scott Fletcher, both from the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, use an auger to measure the ice thickness. If the ice is not thick enough, water pumps will be placed in the drilled hole to help build the ice bridge. The ice bridge takes about five weeks to complete in sub-zero weather. It is five-foot deep, a mile long and capable of supporting more than 110 tons -- which completely vanishes a few months later. The ice bridge helps 354th CES members access and perform annual maintenance on Eielson?s training and bombing ranges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jonathan Snyder).

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Master Sgt. Andy Harper and Tech. Sgt. Scott Fletcher, both from the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, keep an eye on water being pumped from the river to build up the ice bridge. The ice bridge takes about five weeks to complete in sub-zero weather. It is five-foot deep, a mile long and capable of supporting more than 110 tons -- which completely vanishes a few months later. The ice bridge helps 354th CES members access and perform annual maintenance on Eielson's training and bombing ranges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jonathan Snyder).

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Master Sgt. Andy Harper and Tech. Sgt. Scott Fletcher, both from the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, keep an eye on water being pumped from the river to build up the ice bridge. The ice bridge takes about five weeks to complete in sub-zero weather. It is five-foot deep, a mile long and capable of supporting more than 110 tons -- which completely vanishes a few months later. The ice bridge helps 354th CES members access and perform annual maintenance on Eielson's training and bombing ranges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jonathan Snyder).