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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Thomas Johnson, left, and Master Sgt. Anthonio Dais, members of the 8th Maintenance Squadron, assigned to Kunsan Air Base, Republic of South Korea, assemble a Mark 82 bomb during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-1, May 10, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Aircraft Munitions Maintenance Organization Airmen from both Kunsan and Eielson built munitions for exercises RF-A and Northern Edge. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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A Mark 82 bomb gets labeled during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-1, May 10, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Once the munitions are fully assembled and ready for use, a timer can be set to make sure it explodes at a safe distance from the aircraft once dropped. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joe Cedillo, the 8th Maintenance Squadron assistant NCO in charge of conventional maintenance, assigned to Kunsan Air Base, Republic of South Korea, labels the settings of a Mark 82 bomb during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-1, May 10, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Prior to leaving the warehouse, Cedillo inspects each of the MK 82 bombs prior to them leaving the warehouse to ensure they are labeled accurately. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Anthonio Dais, the 8th Maintenance Squadron NCO in charge of precision guided munitons, assigned to Kunsan Air Base, Republic of South Korea, wires a Mark 82 bomb during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-1, May 10, 2016, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Dais said he enjoys participating in RF-A because he gets an opportunity for realistic, hands-on training in a simulated combat exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Scott Thorp, a 354th Maintenance Squadron metals technician, cuts holes for threading on a Mark 82 bomb, May 10, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. During RED FLAG-Alaska 16-1, Aircraft Munitions Maintenance Organization specialists assembled multiple bombs to be dropped for training operations in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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U.S. Air Force maintainers from the 354th Maintenance Squadron and the 8th Maintenance Squadron, assigned to Kunsan Air Base, Republic of South Korea, assemble Mark 82 bombs during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-1, May 9, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Kunsan brought 10 Aircraft Munitions Maintenance Organization Airmen and will participate through Northern Edge exercise operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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Mark 82 bombs wait to be wired for use during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-1, May 9, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Each bomb must be thoroughly inspected before it is loaded onto an aircraft. Within Aircraft Munitions Maintenance Organization, different shops work like a distant assembly line, from storage, to building, then loading. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Scott Thorp, a 354th Maintenance Squadron metals technician, cuts coils to replace threads for a Mark 82 bomb, May 10, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Each member plays an important role when assembling the MK 82 from start to finish. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Scott Thorp, a 354th Maintenance Squadron metals technician, replaces threads on a Mark 82 bomb, May 10, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The Aircraft Munitions Maintenance Organization shop handles each MK 82 from start to finish. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Capt. Karan Bansal, a KC-135 Stratotanker pilot assigned to the 909th Air Refueling Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan, directs his attention to an Indian Air Force airman, May 12, 2016, over the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. As part of RED FLAG-Alaska 16-1, the 67th Fighter Squadron, 80th FS and the 909th ARS conducted an in-flight refueling exercise to demonstrate how tanker support can extend and prolong flight operations for U.S. and coalition aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty)
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An F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft with the 80th Fighter Squadron, Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, lines up to receive fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 909th Air Refueling Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan, to begin an inflight refueling procedure May 12, 2016, inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. In September of 1981, the 80th became the first unit stationed overseas to convert to the F-16 Fighting Falcon and on Jan. 31, 1992, the 80th Tactical Fighter Squadron was redesignated 80 FS. The 80th FS continues to support the United States Contingent in Korea with the same pride and excellence instilled in the squadron from the pilots of the past. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty)
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Three F-16 Fighting Falcon’s with the 80th Fighter Squadron, Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, fly alongside a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 909th Air Refueling Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan, May 12, 2016, inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. The JPARC provides a realistic training environment and allows commanders to train for full spectrum engagements, ranging from individual skills to complex, large-scale joint engagements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty)
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An F-15C Eagle aircraft with the 67th Fighter Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan, parallels alongside a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 909th Air Refueling Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan, to begin an inflight refueling procedure May 12, 2016, inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. More than 75 aircraft and 1,400 participants took part in RED FLAG-Alaska which was mostly exercised throughout the JPARC. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, enabling joint and international units to exchange tactics, techniques and procedures while improving interoperability in a realistic threat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty)
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U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Doug Palmisano, KC-135 Stratotanker boom operator assigned to the 909th Air Refueling Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan, conducts refueling operations May 12, 2016, over the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. Boom operators on a KC-135 have the ability to pump thousands of pounds of fuel to any capable aircraft, thousands of feet above the ground, flying at 200 knots (230 miles per hour), all while only 47 feet from the receiving aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty)
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An F-15C Eagle aircraft with the 67th Fighter Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan, receives fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 909th Air Refueling Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan, May 12, 2016, inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. The KC-135 provides the core aerial refueling capability for the United States Air Force and has excelled in this role for more than 50 years working to accomplish its primary mission of global reach. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty)
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A U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon assigned to the 80th Fighter Squadron out of Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, flies over Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, returning from a mission May 5, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-1. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, enabling joint and international units to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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