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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Michael Brinkmeyer (left), an F-16 Fighting Falcon assistant dedicated crew chief with the18th Aircraft Maintenance Unit, secures U.S. Air Force Maj. Scott Meng, 18th Aggressor Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot, during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-2, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, June 15, 2016. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty)
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A U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II twin-engine, ground-attack aircraft assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron (FS) out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., taxis into place next to Republic of Singapore Air Force and U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons in preparation for an afternoon sortie from the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, flight line alongside taxiing F-15E Strike Eagles deployed from Royal Air Force Lakeneath, England, June 7, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. Pilots, aircrew, maintainers and support personnel coverge at Eielson for RF-A, is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises that enable joint and international forces to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties together in a realistic threat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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A pair of U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II twin-engine, ground-attack aircraft assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron (FS) out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., depart from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, June 7, 2016, to fly toward the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-2. U.S. and partner nation forces like the 354 FS "Bulldogs" use this Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercise to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the more than 67,000 square mile Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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A U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II twin-engine, ground-attack aircraft assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron (FS) out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., increases speed to take off from the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, runway June 7, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises that enable U.S. and partner nation forces like the 354 FS "Bulldogs" to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the more than 67,000 square mile Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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A U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II twin-engine, ground-attack aircraft assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron (FS) out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., takes off from the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, runway June 7, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises that enable U.S. and partner nation forces like the 354 FS "Bulldogs" to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties alongside joint and international forces in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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A U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II twin-engine, ground-attack aircraft assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron (FS) out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., lifts off from the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, runway June 7, 2016, during a RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2 afternoon sortie. RF-A, a series a Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field exercises, enables U.S. and international forces like the 354 FS "Bulldogs" to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the more than 67,000 square miles airspace known as the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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A U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II twin-engine, ground-attack aircraft assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron (FS) out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., taxis past other A-10s along the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, flight line June 6, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises that enable U.S. and partner nation forces like the 354 FS "Bulldogs" to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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U.S. Air Force maintenance Airmen, right, make adjustments to an A-10 Thunderbolt II twin-engine, ground-attack aircraft assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron (FS) out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., as another maintainer guides the work from the aircraft's cockpit June 6, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. This Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercise enables U.S. and partner nation forces like the "Bulldogs" maintainers to sharpen their maintenance skills by launching aircraft and aircrews for simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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A U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron (FS) out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., taxis her twin-engine, ground-attack aircraft out of a hangar on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, June 6, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises that enable U.S. and partner nation forces like the 354 FS "Bulldogs" to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the more than 67,000 square mile Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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A U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolt II twin-engine, ground-attack aircraft assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron (FS) out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., maneuvers down the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, taxiway June 6, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises that enable U.S. and partner nation forces like the 354 FS "Bulldogs" to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties alongside joint and international forces in a realistic threat environment inside the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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U.S. Air Force maintenance Airmen wait to launch an A-10 Thunderbolt II twin-engine, ground-attack aircraft assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron (FS) out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., for an afternoon sortie from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, June 6, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises that enable U.S. and partner nation forces like the 354 FS "Bulldogs" to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the more than 67,000 square mile Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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A U.S. Marine Corps F-18 Hornet assigned to Fixed Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadron 242, Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, taxis down the tarmac June 7, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Eielson serves as a key strategic location for RF-A training and the exercise signifies the United State’s continued commitment to Indo-Asia-Pacific partners. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty)
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U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Austin Perry, front center, an F-18 Hornet powerline mechanic and plane captain assigned to Fixed Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA (AW)) 242, Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, communicates with operations staff over the radio June 7, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. VFMA (AW) is one of more than 30 units participating in RF-A 16-2 that benefits from the unique opportunity to integrate with various joint, coalition and multilateral forces to train at a simulated forward operating base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty)
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A U.S. Marine Corps F-18 Hornet assigned to Fixed Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadron 242, Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, taxis past a Republic of Singapore Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon, June 7, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. In addition to enabling joint and international units to work side-by-side, RF-A allows coalition forces to exchange tactics, techniques and procedures while improving interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty)
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U.S. Marine Corps F-18 Hornet pilots assigned to Fixed Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadron 242, Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, secure themselves inside their cockpit June 7, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A)16-2, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Pilots involved with RF-A are exposed to realistic combat training supported by the 18th Aggressor Squadron, which shares knowledge of flying and provides the best air combat training possible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty)
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A U.S. Marine Corps F-18 Hornet pilot assigned to the Fixed Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadron 242, Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, conducts a pre-flight inspection June 7, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska16-2, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The F-18 is a twin-engine supersonic, all-weather carrier-capable multirole combat jet, designed as both a fighter and attack aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Steven R. Doty)
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