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A U.S. Air Force F-15 Eagle assigned to the 44th Fighter Squadron out of Kadena Air Base, Japan, breaks away from a formation with another F-15 and two U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., as they return to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, after the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. RF-A exercises enable joint and international units to sharpen their skills and build interoperability by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A pair of U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., returns to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, after the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, enabling joint and international units like VMFA-232 to sharpen their skills and build interoperability by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornets assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., taxi ahead of U.S. Air Force F-15 Eagle aircraft after returning to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1. This exercise provides unique opportunities to integrate various forces into joint, coalition and multilateral training from simulated forward operating bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A U.S. Marine Corps pilot taxis his F/A-18C Hornet assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., toward its ramps space after returning to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, after the first combat training mission of RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, which enables U.S. Marines in units like VMFA-232 to prepare for future combat and contingency operations in a realistic threat environment inside the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A variety of units aircraft and personnel, including U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft and personnel from Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., gather in their ramp space as a pair of U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft assigned to the 36th Fighter Squadron out of Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, prepare to land at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, after the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises like RF-A are vital to maintaining peace and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A pilot assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., taxis his F/A-18C Hornet aircraft down the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, flight line as the sun rises Oct. 10, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1. The Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex provides more than 67,000 square miles of realistic training environment and allows commanders to train for full spectrum engagements, ranging from individual skills to complex, large-scale joint engagements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornets assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., line up at the end of the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, runway Oct. 10, 2016, for the first combat training mission of RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, which enables U.S. Marines in units like VMFA-232 to prepare for future combat and contingency operations in a realistic threat environment inside the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft from Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., takes off from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, for the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. This exercise provides unique opportunities to integrate various forces into joint, coalition and multilateral training from simulated forward operating bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft from Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., takes off from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, for the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. RF-A enables joint and international units to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment, which allows them to exchange tactics, techniques and procedures while improving interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft from Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., takes off from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, for the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, which enables U.S. Marines in units like VMFA-232 to prepare for future combat and contingency operations in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., taxis past the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, air traffic control tower Oct. 10, 2016, in preparation for the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 mission. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, which enables U.S. Marines in units like VMFA-232 to prepare for future combat and contingency operations in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A pilot assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., taxis his F/A-18C Hornet aircraft down the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, flight line as the sun rises Oct. 10, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, which enables U.S. Marines in units like VMFA-232 to prepare for future combat and contingency operations in a realistic threat environment inside the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A pilot assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., taxis his F/A-18C Hornet aircraft down the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, flight line as U.S. Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft wait in their ramp space in the background Oct. 10, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1. The Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex provides more than 67,000 square miles of realistic training environment and allows commanders to train for full spectrum engagements, ranging from individual skills to complex, large-scale joint engagements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., taxi past Republic of Korea F-15K Slam Eagle aircraft as they proceed to the end of the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, runway Oct. 10, 2016, for the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 mission. This exercise provides unique opportunities to integrate various forces into joint, coalition and multilateral training from simulated forward operating bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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Republic of Korea Air Force (ROKAF) F-15K Slam Eagle multi-role fighter aircraft taxi toward their ramp space on the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, flight line Oct. 10, 2016, as a U.S. Air Force HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter assigned to the 210th Rescue Squadron prepares for its own mission after the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training sortie ended. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises vital to maintaining peace and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region, and providing U.S. units and partner nation forces the opportunity to sharpen their combat skills and strengthen interoperability inside more than 67,000 square miles of airspace in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A pair of U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons assigned to the 36th Fighter Squadron out of Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, returns to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, after the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. RED FLAG training in Alaska signifies continued commitment to the Indo-Asia-Pacific region through a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, enabling joint and international units to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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