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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Troy Moncrief, a 354th Civil Engineering Squadron wastewater apprentice, walks down the hall of the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, wastewater treatment plant July 14, 2016. Moncrief compares the underground portion of the plant to a submarine with its low hanging pipes, ladders, and tight spaces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Troy Moncrief, a 354th Civil Engineering Squadron wastewater apprentice, uses a boat to inspect aeration equipment in ponds at the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, wastewater treatment plant July 15, 2016. The manufactured holding pond lined with thick black plastic hold millions of gallons of waste that is treated in a week’s time after it enters the plant. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Troy Moncrief, a 354th Civil Engineering Squadron wastewater apprentice, uses a boat to inspect aeration equipment in ponds at the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, wastewater treatment plant July 15, 2016. The manufactured holding pond lined with thick black plastic hold millions of gallons of waste that is treated in a week’s time after it enters the plant. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Troy Moncrief, a 354th Civil Engineering Squadron wastewater apprentice, displays solids removed from sewage after he removed it from a trap underground at the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, wastewater treatment plant July 14, 2016. Anything that cant be treated by aeration, bacteria or chemicals is removed prior to entering settling tanks and ponds. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Troy Moncrief, a 354th Civil Engineering Squadron wastewater apprentice, displays solids removed from sewage after he removed it from a trap underground at the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, wastewater treatment plant July 14, 2016. Anything that cant be treated by aeration, bacteria or chemicals is removed prior to entering settling tanks and ponds. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel)
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U.S. Air Force Col. Brian Toth, the 354th Operations Group (OG) commander, left, thanks Staff Sgt. Dale LeCrone, a 354th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron dedicated crew chief prior to a morning sortie June 16, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Toth attributes the success of RF-A to the hardworking men and women of the 354th OG. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Col. Brian Toth, the 354th Operations Group commander, taxis for a morning sortie June 16, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-2, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Toth took command last July and logged more than 200 hours in the F-16. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Col. Brian Toth, the 354th Operations Group commander, climbs an F-16 Fighting Falcon before a morning sortie, June 16, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-2, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Toth took command in July 2015, making this his third assignment at Eielson. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Dale LeCrone, a 354th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron dedicated crew chief, talks with Col. Brian Toth, the 354th Operations Group commander, before performing pre-flight checks June 16, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. As a prior 353rd Combat Training Squadron commander, Toth has held multiple roles in RF-A and uses that knowledge to make the joint training exercise as successful as possible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Col. Brian Toth, the 354th Operations Group commander, pauses for a brief photo in his office, June 17, 2016, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. During two prior assignments at Eielson, Toth served as a weapons officer with the 18th Fighter Squadron, and later as the 353rd Combat Training Squadron commander. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Nicole Taylor/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Kurtis Douge, a survival, evasion, resistance and escape craftsman assigned as the 353rd Combat Training Squadron personnel recovery division superintendent, walks Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., through using a signaling mirror during a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. The personnel recovery exercise provides A-10 pilots like Kaaekuahiwi the unique opportunity to experience combat search and rescue from a different perspective. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., prepares for extraction as an HH-60G Pave Hawk rescue helicopter assigned to the Alaska Air National Guard's 210th Rescue Squadron approaches while a 354th Fighter Squadron A-10 Thunderbolt II passes by June 14, 2016, as part of a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, enabling joint and international units to sharpen their combat skills in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., applies face paint while evading capture during a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A gives U.S. and partner nation forces an opportunity to sharpen combat skills like search and rescue in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, which at more than 67,000 square miles, is the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., aligns his compass and map during a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex (JPARC), June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. The JPARC provides a realistic training environment and allows commanders to train for full spectrum engagements, ranging from individual skills, such as isolated personnel evading capture, to complex, large-scale joint engagements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Kurtis Douge, a survival, evasion, resistance and escape craftsman assigned as the 353rd Combat Training Squadron personnel recovery division superintendent, talks about evasion steps with Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., as they use the terrain to conceal their location during a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, enabling joint and international units like the Bulldogs to sharpen their combat skills in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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A U.S. Air Force flight engineer gunner assigned to the Alaska Air National Guard's 210th Rescue Squadron (RQS) Detachment (Det) 1 watches for opposing forces as a pararescuman hoists an extracted pilot into an HH-60G Pave Hawk rescue helicopter at a training site inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex as part of a personnel recovery exercise June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. The 210th RQS Det 1, based at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, regularly trains for rescue missions, providing a crucial mission during RF-A exercises, which occur in a more than 67,000 square mile area known as the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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