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Survival
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Survival
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Survival
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U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Kurtis Douge, a survival, evasion, resistance and escape craftsman assigned as the 353rd Combat Training Squadron personnel recovery division superintendent, walks Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., through using a signaling mirror during a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. The personnel recovery exercise provides A-10 pilots like Kaaekuahiwi the unique opportunity to experience combat search and rescue from a different perspective. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., prepares for extraction as an HH-60G Pave Hawk rescue helicopter assigned to the Alaska Air National Guard's 210th Rescue Squadron approaches while a 354th Fighter Squadron A-10 Thunderbolt II passes by June 14, 2016, as part of a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, enabling joint and international units to sharpen their combat skills in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., applies face paint while evading capture during a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A gives U.S. and partner nation forces an opportunity to sharpen combat skills like search and rescue in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, which at more than 67,000 square miles, is the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., aligns his compass and map during a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex (JPARC), June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. The JPARC provides a realistic training environment and allows commanders to train for full spectrum engagements, ranging from individual skills, such as isolated personnel evading capture, to complex, large-scale joint engagements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Kurtis Douge, a survival, evasion, resistance and escape craftsman assigned as the 353rd Combat Training Squadron personnel recovery division superintendent, talks about evasion steps with Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., as they use the terrain to conceal their location during a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, enabling joint and international units like the Bulldogs to sharpen their combat skills in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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A U.S. Air Force flight engineer gunner assigned to the Alaska Air National Guard's 210th Rescue Squadron (RQS) Detachment (Det) 1 watches for opposing forces as a pararescuman hoists an extracted pilot into an HH-60G Pave Hawk rescue helicopter at a training site inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex as part of a personnel recovery exercise June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. The 210th RQS Det 1, based at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, regularly trains for rescue missions, providing a crucial mission during RF-A exercises, which occur in a more than 67,000 square mile area known as the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A U.S. Air Force HH-60G Pave Hawk rescue helicopter assigned to the Alaska Air National Guard's 210th Rescue Squadron Detachment 1 departs an extraction point with an A-10 pilot safely on board as an A-10 Thunderbolt II loiters nearby to provide close air support as part of a personnel recovery exercise June 14, 2016, at a training site inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. The 210th RQS Det 1, based at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, is one of many U.S. and partner nation units participating in RF-A 16-2, a Pacific Air Forces commander-directed exercise that allows commanders to train for full spectrum engagements in the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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An HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter and rescue crew assigned to the Alaska Air National Guard's 210th Rescue Squadron Detachment 1 approaches a pilot waiting at an extraction site inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, as part of a personnel recovery exercise June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska 16-2. The primary goal of the 353rd Combat Training Squadron's personnel recovery division is to develop effective rescue scenarios for joint and international forces, which provides unique opportunities for to integrate various forces into joint, coalition and multilateral training from simulated forward operating bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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A U.S. Air Force flight engineer gunner assigned to the Alaska Air National Guard's 210th Rescue Squadron (RQS) Detachment (Det) 1 watches for opposing forces as his HH-60G Pave Hawk rescue helicopter approaches a pilot waiting for extraction inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex as part of a personnel recovery exercise June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. The 210th RQS Det 1, based at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, provides a crucial support role for potential alert incidents during RF-A exercises, which can occur in the more than 67,000 square mile area known as the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
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U.S. Air Force Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., translates information during a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, enabling joint and international units to sharpen their combat skills in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, which at more than 67,000 square miles, is the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released)
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