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  • Refueling RF-A 21-3 one gallon at a time

    RED FLAG-Alaska 21-3 is a realistic combat training exercise that provides air to air and air to ground combat training and is essential to the success of air and space operations. With over 100 aircraft flying per day, the 354th Logistics Readiness Squadron’s fuels flight, also known as petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL), ensures each one is fueled and ready to fly.
  • Air Traffic Control keeps Red Flag 21-3 aircraft, pilots safe

    As RED FLAG-Alaska 21-3 rages across Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, far above the roar and scramble of the base’s flight line is a team of air traffic controllers bringing order to the exercise’s fervent operations.
  • Eielson safety office stays ahead of the curve during Red Flag 21-3

    As the philosopher, The Notorious B.I.G., wrote, “Mo’ money, mo’ problems.” But what if instead of money, it was a flightline full of fifth-generation fighter aircraft from the U.S. Air Force? Enter the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, safety office.
  • Tactical advantage: The RED FLAG-Alaska veteran

    ‘Tuco,’ the 80th Fighter Squadron assistant director of operations and chief of standards and evaluation, has inevitably become a RED FLAG-Alaska veteran after having flown for both Blue and Red air in over 15 RF iterations.
  • POL keeps RED FLAG-Alaska 21-2 fueled to fight

    Blues, greys, coyote brown, and greens surround a Koku Jieitai (Japan Air Self-Defense Force) F-15J Eagle, refueling the aircraft together during a 70 degree and sunny day on Eielson Air Force Base.
  • RF-A 21-2 takes off from Eielson AFB

    The first aircraft operating in support of RED FLAG-Alaska 21-2 took to the skies from the Eielson flightline early this morning.
  • Four teams one fight: RF-A 21-1 comes to a close

    “30 seconds, 10 seconds, 5 seconds, 3…2…1...hack. Welcome to debrief.” With that, the 353rd Combat Training Squadron concluded RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1 signifying the end of RF-A 2020 season.
  • RF-A 21-1 focuses on joint integration

    The National Defense strategy has shifted from fighting insurgents and terrorist organizations to focusing on near-peer adversaries. This iteration of RED FLAG-Alaska is designed to ensure that if the U.S. has to engage or defend against near-peer adversaries, all U.S military branches could work together to project global security.
  • Navy mechanics keep Growlers in the air during RF-A 21-1

    U.S. Navy aircraft mechanics assigned to the Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 perform maintenance on an EA-18G Growler during RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1 on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 13, 2020. RED FLAG-Alaska exercises are designed to provide training for deployed aircrew, maintenance and support personnel in sustainment of large-force
  • RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1 brings joint services together for training

    RED FLAG-Alaska 21-1, a Pacific Air Forces-directed field training exercise simulating realistic air combat conditions, is scheduled to begin Oct. 8 and continue through Oct. 23, 2020.
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