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  • Arctic Anvil executes multi-domain operations on a large-scale

    During the last RED FLAG-Alaska exercise of the year, forces banded together for Arctic Anvil, a military training exercise which took place Oct. 9-21 at the Donnelly Training Area near Fort Greely. Arctic Anvil is a joint, multi-national, force-on-force training exercise that included live, virtual and constructive elements. The purpose of the training was to prepare the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team for their rotation at the Army’s National Training Center in California early next year. The NTC conducts tough and realistic Unified Land Operations to prepare Brigade Combat Teams and other units for combat.
  • RED FLAG-Alaska 18-3 concludes

    Aug. 24, 2018, marks the ending of another iteration of RED FLAG-Alaska. During RF-A 18-3, U.S. and partner nation forces from around the globe, including the Royal Canadian Air Force, the Royal Air Force, and the Royal Australian Air Force, came together to conduct training in the air and on the ground to help improve interoperability between the U.S. and its allies; and to exchange tactics, techniques and procedures.
  • Essential players in RED FLAG-Alaska exercise

    U.S. Air Force Captain’s Karan Bansal, left, and Kyle McCullough, KC-135 Stratotanker pilots assigned to the 909th Air Refueling Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan, orient to the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, May 12, 2016. The JPARC consists of all the land, air, sea, space and cyberspace used for military training in Alaska, providing
  • U.S. Air Force, Indian Air Force join forces during RED FLAG-Alaska

    Vital alignment between U.S. Air Force and Indian Air Force propels RED FLAG-Alaska exercise
  • Aircrew flight equipment: no masking safety

    While pilots fly at the speed of sound, multi-tasking is in full force, but safety remains a top priority in the skies. Maintenance Airmen make sure each aircraft is ready to fly, but one crew works meticulously behind the scenes to ensure each pilot’s flight equipment is in top working condition.
  • Paws below zero

    Every paw press into powder dry snow produces a sharp shriek in to the dark frigid air only heard in negative temperatures. Not a breath through the wet, black nostrils isn’t without effort inhaling painful sniffs intent on detecting deadly explosives, drugs or intruders. Military working dogs from the 354th Security Forces Squadron march alongside the human defenders who stand “Ready to go at 50 below” 24 hours a day protecting assets that set atop the world in the U.S. Air Force’s Pacific theater of operations.
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