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U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Kahdija Slaughter, a 354th Fighter Wing Public Affairs broadcast journalist and USO volunteer, serves a visiting service member a slice of pizza Aug. 3, 2017, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The USO opened for the Pro Football Hall of Fame Game 2017 and provided free pizza. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Eric M. Fisher) USO extends hours to support RED FLAG-Alaska
The United Services Organization was founded in 1941, after a request from President Franklin Roosevelt to help improve morale and recreation for U.S. Service members. With more than 200 locations throughout the world the USO has definitely done just that, but in some locations support can still be limited due to remoteness or lack of volunteers.
0 8/08
2017
Celebrating 70 years of Air Power Celebrating 70 years of Air Power
Since Sept. 18, 1947, the Air Force has been providing critical air power to defend the United States. We have strived to protect the freedoms afforded to us and have made advances in technology and airframes. From the Bell X-1 Glamorous Glennis aircraft to the F-35A Lightning II aircraft, the Air Force has lived by the motto “higher, faster and farther.” Capt. Charles “Chuck” Yeager made the first step toward history when he took his first flight on the Bell XS-1, a rocket-powered USAF research plane.
0 8/02
2017
RCAF prepares for success RCAF prepares for success
Two Royal Canadian Air Force CF-18 Hornet fighter aircraft assigned to the 425th Tactical Fighter Squadron from Canadian Forces Base, Bagotville, Canada, sit on the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, runway while two Canadian airmen work in the cockpit Aug. 1, 2017, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-3. RF-A exercises provide realistic combat training,
0 8/02
2017
A U.S. Navy EA-18G Growler electronic warfare aircraft assigned to Electronic Attack Squadron 138, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash., takes off during FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-3, July 31, 2017, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. RF-A provides an optimal training environment in the Indo-Asia Pacific Region and focuses on improving ground, space, and cyberspace combat readiness and interoperability for U.S. and international forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac Johnson) RF-A takes to the skies
A U.S. Navy EA-18G Growler electronic warfare aircraft assigned to Electronic Attack Squadron 138, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash., takes off during FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-3, July 31, 2017, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. RF-A provides an optimal training environment in the Indo-Asia Pacific Region and focuses on improving ground, space,
0 7/31
2017
An 80th Fighter Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon flies in the skies above Kunsan Air Base, South Korea. The 80th will take part in Red Flag Alaska over course of several days. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Senior Airman Armando A. Schwier-Morales) 80th Fighter Squadron arrives for Red Flag-Alaska 17-3
Members of the 80th Fighter Squadron arrived at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, to participate in RED FLAG-Alaska 17-3 today. Over the next two weeks, the 80th FS will train to defend against surface-to-air and air-to-air threats, including those provided by an Aggressor unit stationed at Eielson AFB, and work with U.S. and international forces to
0 7/31
2017
A U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft takes off from the flight line during RED FLAG-Alaska 17-2 June 13, 2017, at Eielson Air Base, Alaska. RED FLAG-Alaska provides an optimal training environment in the Indo-Asia Pacific Region and focuses on improving ground, space, and cyberspace combat readiness and interoperabillity for U.S. and international forces.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Haley D. Phillips) Final RED FLAG - Alaska of 2017 provides joint, multi-domain, multinational and fast combat training
It’s that time again when aircraft from U.S. and partner nations soar through the Alaskan sky as RED FLAG-Alaska has officially kicked-off for the final time this season. RF-A 17-3 is scheduled to run from July 27 to August 11. As one of the Air Force’s premier flying exercises, Eielson Air Force Base has invited U.S. and international partners to participate in this uniquely designed training experience that could potentially save their lives.
0 7/28
2017
U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) work with a local engineer to build a greenhouse in Old Harbor, Alaska. The 354th CES Airmen completed multiple projects in the town, which helped improve the community’s quality of life. (Courtesy photo) 354th CES makes Old Harbor new
Kodiak is a small island located off the coast of Alaska, a place where the wilderness is abundant, roads aren’t paved and people are scarce. This summer members of the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron spent 74 days in the town of Old Harbor on Kodiak completing various projects to help improve their quality of life.
0 7/26
2017
U.S. Air Force Col. David Mineau, the 354th Fighter Wing commander, passes the 354th Maintenance Group (MXG) guidon to Col. Peter Gryzen, the 354th MXG commander, July 18, 2017, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Gryzen assumed command after completing his Master of Science Degree in National Security Strategy at the National War College in Fort McNair, Washington D.C. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Eric M. Fisher) 354th Maintenance Group change of command
U.S. Air Force Col. David Mineau, the 354th Fighter Wing commander, passes the 354th Maintenance Group (MXG) guidon to Col. Peter Gryzen, the 354th MXG commander, July 18, 2017, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Gryzen assumed command after completing his Master of Science Degree in National Security Strategy at the National War College in Fort
0 7/21
2017
U.S. Air Force 1st Lt.’s Julian Rooks and Kevin Long, both A-10 Thunderbolt II pilots assigned to the 25th Fighter Squadron out of Osan Air Base, South Korea, put on protective equipment June 29, 2017, on the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, Delta Junction, Alaska. Both Rooks and Long were afforded the chance to see their mission happen from the perspective of a Tactical Air Control Party Airman. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Isaac Johnson) Seeing the other side
There are two sides to every story; your side and someone else’s side. The same holds true for Tactical Air Control Party Airmen and A-10 Thunderbolt II pilots. Although these Airmen are constantly working together, they never get to see the same side of the story as the other. During Distant Frontier, pilots assigned to the 25th Fighter Squadron out of Osan Air Base, South Korea, accompanied TACP Airmen assigned to the 5th Air Support Operations Squadron, deep into the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex in order to better understand what the TACP Airmen see from the ground.
0 7/19
2017
U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Alvin Dyer, the 354th Civil Engineer Squadron superintendent, poses for a photo in his office July 13, 2017, at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Dyer didn’t always want to become a chief master sergeant, but he said life had different plans for him. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cassie Whitman) Mentoring moments: Chief Master Sgt. Alvin Dyer
“Airmen are made into leaders like you forge steel into a sword. They get a little nick, you iron it out and sharpen it. Most people won’t see the process of how you became a senior leader; bang the steel, put it in cold water and let it cool, heat it up and sharpen.” - Chief Master Sgt. Alvin Dyer
0 7/19
2017
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